Skip to main content

Exit WCAG Theme

Switch to Non-ADA Website

Accessibility Options

Select Text Sizes

Select Text Color

Website Accessibility Information Close Options
Close Menu

Engaged on Valentine’s Day? Why you should consider a prenup

About four million Americans got engaged on Valentine’s Day, according to a recent survey. This means that, at some point in the next couple of years, about two million weddings will take place in Las Vegas and throughout the country. If you are one of the four million recently engaged, there is one detail that you should not overlook as you plan your big day: deciding whether to sign a prenuptial agreement.

According to financial experts and family law attorneys, prenuptial agreements have been on the rise in recent years. Nearly three-fourths of divorce lawyers who responded to a poll conducted by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers stated that they saw an increase in prenups between 2005 and 2010. Further, more women are now initiating the process as they become more successful in the workplace.

You may think that, because you are not a professional athlete or movie star, that you don’t need a prenup. But that may not be the case. Today, more couples are choosing to marry later in life, which means that they are likely well-established in their career and own some significant assets. In these situations, a prenuptial agreement may be a very good idea.

In addition, couples who are marrying for the second or third time should consider a prenup. This is especially true if they have children from an earlier relationship – a prenup will ensure that their children are taken care of in the event of the parent’s death or divorce.

Even if you don’t decide to sign a prenup, it may be a good idea to discuss it. Finances are one of the most common reasons for a divorce, so being able to have a frank discussion about money could help your marriage in the long run.

Source: Reuters, “When Valentines and prenups go together,” Kathleen Kingsbury, Feb. 15, 2012

By submitting this form I acknowledge that form submissions via this website do not create an attorney-client relationship, and any information I send is not protected by attorney-client privilege.

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.

No content on this site may be reused in any fashion without written permission from www.kainenlawgroup.com

Skip footer and go back to main navigation